The Master Butchers Singing Club

The Master Butchers Singing Club is a 2003 novel by Louise Erdrich. It follows the life of Fidelis Waldvogel and his family, as well as Delphine Watzka and her partner Cyprian, as they adjust in their separate lives in the small town of Argus, North Dakota. Bookended by World War I, which Fidelis and Cyprian fought in, and World War II, which Fidelis’ children fight in, the title contains several overarching themes including family, tradition, loss, betrayal, and memory, to name a few.

Much of The Master Butchers Singing Club revolves around the German American cultural tradition, which is part of Erdrich's personal heritage, though she is best known as a Native American novelist.

The novel has been developed into a stage play by Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Marsha Norman, and premiered as part of the Guthrie Theater's 2010/11 season in September 2010 under the direction of Francesca Zambello.

Read more about The Master Butchers Singing ClubPlot Summary, Significant Characters, Themes, German-American Heritage, Reviews, Literary Criticism, Theatre

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The Master Butchers Singing Club - Theatre
... In 2010, Master Butcher's Singing Club opened at the Guthrie Theater in Minneapolis Minnesota ...

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