Sword - Sword Scabbards and Suspension

Sword Scabbards and Suspension

Common accessories to the sword include the scabbard, as well as the sword belt.

  • Scabbard: The scabbard, also known as the Sheath, is a protective cover often provided for the sword blade. Over the millennia, scabbards have been made of many materials, including leather, wood, and metals such as brass or steel. The metal fitting where the blade enters the leather or metal scabbard is called the throat, which is often part of a larger scabbard mount, or locket, that bears a carrying ring or stud to facilitate wearing the sword. The blade's point in leather scabbards is usually protected by a metal tip, or chape, which on both leather and metal scabbards is often given further protection from wear by an extension called a drag, or shoe.
  • Sword belt: A sword belt is a belt with an attachment for the sword's scabbard, used to carry it when not in use. It is usually fixed to the scabbard of the sword, providing a fast means of drawing the sword in battle. Examples of sword belts include the Balteus used by the Roman legionary.

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Blade Weapons - Sword Scabbards and Suspension
... Common accessories to the sword include the scabbard, as well as the sword belt ... Scabbard The scabbard, also known as the Sheath, is a protective cover often provided for the sword blade ... Over the millennia, scabbards have been made of many materials, including leather, wood, and metals such as brass or steel ...

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