Route Inspection Problem

In graph theory, a branch of mathematics, the Chinese postman problem (CPP), postman tour or route inspection problem is to find a shortest closed path or circuit that visits every edge of a (connected) undirected graph. When the graph has an Eulerian circuit (a closed walk that covers every edge once), that circuit is an optimal solution.

Alan Goldman of the U.S. National Bureau of Standards first coined the name 'Chinese Postman Problem' for this problem, as it was originally studied by the Chinese mathematician Mei-Ku Kuan in 1962.

Read more about Route Inspection Problem:  Eulerian Paths and Circuits, T-joins, Solution, Variants

Other articles related to "route inspection problem, problem":

Route Inspection Problem - Variants
... A few variants of the Chinese Postman Problem have been studied and shown to be NP-complete ... Min Chinese postman problem for mixed graphs for this problem, some of the edges may be directed and can therefore only be visited from one direction ... When the problem is minimal traversal of a digraph it is known as the "New York Street Sweeper problem." Min k-Chinese postman problem find k cycles all starting at a designated location such that each ...

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