Productive and Unproductive Labour

Productive and unproductive labour were concepts used in classical political economy mainly in the 18th and 19th century, which survive today to some extent in modern management discussions, economic sociology and Marxist or Marxian economic analysis. The concepts strongly influenced the construction of national accounts in the Soviet Union and other Soviet-type societies (see Material Product System).

Read more about Productive And Unproductive Labour:  Classical Political Economy, A Quote From Adam Smith, Neoclassical Economics, National Accounts, Marx's Critique, Productive Labour As Misfortune?, Ecological Critique, Material Product Accounts in Soviet-type Societies

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