Plastic Armour

Plastic armour (also known as plastic protection) was a type of vehicle armour originally developed for merchant ships by Edward Terrell of the British Admiralty in 1940. It essentially consisted of small, evenly sized rock or stones in a matrix of bitumen. It was typically applied as a casting in situ to existing ship structure in a layer of about two inches thick or formed in equally thick sections on a half inch thick steelplate for mounting as gun shields and similar.

It replaced the use of concrete slabs which although expected to provide protection were prone to cracking and breaking up when struck by armour piercing bullets. Plastic armour was highly effective at stopping armour piercing bullets because the very hard particles would deflect the bullet which would then lodge between plastic armour and the steel backing plate. Plastic armour could be applied by pouring it into a cavity formed by the steel backing plate and a temporary wooden form.

Production of the armour was by road construction firms in a similar way to road coverings, the organization of the armouring being carried out by naval officiers in key ports.

Read more about Plastic ArmourDevelopment, American Production, Tank Protection

Other articles related to "plastic armour, plastic, armour":

Plastic Armour - Tank Protection
... To protect against the largest Panzerfaust, eight to twelve tons of plastic protection were required for an M4, while an M26 Pershing's greater base armour meant it required only 7.1 ... New panels made of welded steel armour, half an inch thick on the sides and three-quarters of an inch thick on the faces, were designed, but their ... This new type of panel used 1½-inch mild steel instead of armour steel, and had a 2-inch plate of 21ST aluminium alloy backing the face plate for reinforcement ...
Vehicle Armour - Materials - Plastic
... Plastic metal, was a type of vehicle armour originally developed for merchant ships by the British Admiralty in 1940 ... Plastic armour was highly effective at stopping armour piercing bullets because the hard granite particles would deflect the bullet which would then lodge ... Plastic armour could be applied by pouring it into a cavity formed by the steel backing plate and a temporary wooden form ...

Famous quotes containing the words armour and/or plastic:

    The man whose silent days
    In harmless joys are spent,
    Whom hopes cannot delude,
    Nor sorrow discontent:

    That man needs neither towers
    Nor armour for defence,
    Nor secret vaults to fly
    From thunder’s violence.
    Thomas Campion (1567–1620)

    The plastic surgeon’s knife slashes at time, which may seem to retreat, but then keeps on coming.
    Mason Cooley (b. 1927)