Ninjutsu - The 18 Skills

The 18 Skills

According to Bujinkan members Ninja Jūhakkei, the eighteen disciplines (jūhakkei < jūhachi-kei) were first stated in the scrolls of Togakure-ryū. Subsequently they became definitive for all ninjutsu schools by providing total training of the warrior in various fighting arts and agarter.

Ninja jūhakkei was often studied along with Bugei Jūhappan (the "18 samurai fighting art skills"). Though some are used in the same way by both samurai and ninja, other techniques were used differently by the two groups.

The 18 disciplines are:

  1. Seishinteki kyōyō (spiritual refinement)
  2. Taijutsu (unarmed combat)
  3. Kenjutsu (sword techniques)
  4. jutsu (stick and staff techniques)
  5. Sōjutsu (spear techniques)
  6. Naginatajutsu (naginata techniques)
  7. Kusarigamajutsu (kusarigama techniques)
  8. Shurikenjutsu (throwing weapons techniques)
  9. Kayakujutsu (pyrotechnics)
  10. Hensōjutsu (disguise and impersonation)
  11. Shinobi-iri (stealth and entering methods)
  12. Bajutsu (horsemanship)
  13. Sui-ren (water training)
  14. Bōryaku (tactics)
  15. Chōhō (espionage)
  16. Intonjutsu (escaping and concealment)
  17. Tenmon (meteorology)
  18. Chi-mon (geography)

The name of the discipline of taijutsu (体術?), literally means "body skill" or "body art". Historically, the word taijutsu is often (in Japan) used interchangeably with jujutsu (as well as many other terms) to refer to a range of grappling skills. The term is also used in the martial art of aikido to distinguish the unarmed fighting techniques from other (e.g. stick fighting) techniques. In ninjutsu, especially since the emergence of the ninja movie genre in the 80s, it is also used to avoid the undesired bravado of explicitly referring to "ninja" combat techniques.

Read more about this topic:  Ninjutsu

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