Matt Jarvis - Early Life

Early Life

Jarvis' parents, Nick and Linda, both played table tennis professionally and each reached number one in the sport's British rankings. Later they set up the table tennis supplies company Jarvis Sports, which relocated from Guisborough to Guildford in the same year that Jarvis was born.

During his years at school in Surrey, Jarvis excelled at several sports, becoming a county champion in both swimming and athletics. He also gained ten GCSE qualifications.

Read more about this topic:  Matt Jarvis

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