Locally Regular Space - Formal Definition

Formal Definition

A topological space X is said to be locally regular if and only if each point, x, of X has a neighbourhood that is regular under the subspace topology. Equivalently, a space X is locally regular if and only if the collection of all open sets that are regular under the subspace topology forms a base for the topology on X.

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Other articles related to "formal definition":

Big O Notation - Example
... In typical usage, the formal definition of O notation is not used directly rather, the O notation for a function f(x) is derived by the following simplification rules If f(x) is a sum of several ... One may confirm this calculation using the formal definition let f(x) = 6x4 − 2x3 + 5 and g(x) = x4 ... Applying the formal definition from above, the statement that f(x) = O(x4) is equivalent to its expansion, for some suitable choice of x0 and M and for all x > x0 ...
Atomic SP-DEVS - Formal Definition
... The above controller for crosswalk lights can be modeled by an atomic SP-DEVS model ... Formally, an atomic SP-DEVS is a 7-tuple where is a finite set of input events is a finite set of output events is a finite set of states is the initial state is the time advanced function which defines the lifespan of a state where is the set of non-negative rational numbers plus infinity ...

Famous quotes containing the words definition and/or formal:

    Although there is no universal agreement as to a definition of life, its biological manifestations are generally considered to be organization, metabolism, growth, irritability, adaptation, and reproduction.
    The Columbia Encyclopedia, Fifth Edition, the first sentence of the article on “life” (based on wording in the First Edition, 1935)

    It is in the nature of allegory, as opposed to symbolism, to beg the question of absolute reality. The allegorist avails himself of a formal correspondence between “ideas” and “things,” both of which he assumes as given; he need not inquire whether either sphere is “real” or whether, in the final analysis, reality consists in their interaction.
    Charles, Jr. Feidelson, U.S. educator, critic. Symbolism and American Literature, ch. 1, University of Chicago Press (1953)