List of Early Warships of The English Navy

List Of Early Warships Of The English Navy

This is a list of early warships belonging to the English sovereign or the English Government, the precursor to the Royal Navy of England (from 1707 of Great Britain, and subsequently of the United Kingdom). These include major and minor warships from 1485 until 1660, the latter being the year in which the Royal Navy came formally into existence with the Restoration of Charles II (before the Interregnum, English warships had been the personal property of the monarch and were collectively termed "the king's ships"). Between Charles I's execution in 1649 and the Restoration eleven years later, the Navy became the property of the state (Commonwealth and Protectorate), under which it expanded dramatically in size.

Read more about List Of Early Warships Of The English NavyGlossary, List of English Warships Before 1485, List of English Warships 1485-1603, List of English Warships (1603-1642), List of Major English Warships of The English Civil War, The Commonwealth and Protectorate (1642-166, List of Smaller English Warships of The English Civil War, The Commonwealth and Protectorate (1642-1

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List Of Early Warships Of The English Navy - List of Smaller English Warships of The English Civil War, The Commonwealth and Protectorate (1642-1
... This list is incomplete you can help by expanding it ... (This list has been completed for purpose-built craft, but numerous captured and purchased vessels need to be added) Purchased vessels of the 1640s ...

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