Korean Garden - Trees, Plants and Symbolic Landscape of A Korean Garden

Trees, Plants and Symbolic Landscape of A Korean Garden

The vernacular of the Korean garden generally includes evergreen trees (various species of Korean pine) as a constant, flowering pear trees in the spring; bamboo forests alongside the secondary entrance gates of temples and palaces symbolize fidelity and honesty; and straight walks tend to be bordered by larger sized gravels of irregular shape. These features are especially noticeable in restorations.

Terrain tends to follow natural courses, and unlike the traditional Chinese garden, the use of straight paths is not proscribed, but lessened. Significant or important elements tend to face east. And Korean readings of Pungsu are regarded with great care, as geomancy was a strong influence in aligning the gardens with stelae, halls and buildings.

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