Indian South Africans

Indian South Africans are people of Indian descent living in South Africa and mostly live in and around the city of Durban, making it 'the largest 'Indian' city outside India'. Most Indians in South Africa are descendents of migrants from colonial India (South Asia) during late 19th-century through early 20th-century. At other times Indians were subsumed in the broader geographical category "Asians", including persons originating in present-day Iran and parts of the small Chinese community.

There remains a cultural, religious and racial overlap for "Asians" and "Indian South Africans". During the most intense period of segregation and apartheid, "Indian", "Asian", "Coloured", and "Malay" group identities defined where a classified person was permitted to live under the Group Areas Act.

During ideological apartheid from 1948 to 1994, Indians were called, and often voluntarily accepted, terms that ranged from "Black" to "Asians" to "Indians." Some citizens believed that these terms were improvements on the negatively defined identity of "Non-White", which was their previous status. Politically conscious and nationalistic Indian South Africans wanted to show both their heritage and their local roots. Increasingly they self-identified as "African", "Black", "South African" and, when necessary, "Indian South Africans".

Nonetheless, the spread of democratic elections has sometimes heightened ethnic loyalties. Politicians and groups have looked for means to mobilize power in the competitive parliamentary democracy which South Africa has become since 1994.

Read more about Indian South Africans:  Religion, Languages, Media and Entertainment

Other articles related to "south, indian south africans":

William I Of The Netherlands - Principal Changes
... seats were divided equally between the North and the South (modern-day Belgium), although the population of the North (2 million) was significantly less than that of the South (3.5 million) ... The constitution was accepted in the North, but not in the South ... The under-representation of the South was one of the causes of the Belgian Revolution ...
48th (South Midland) Division
... The British 48th (South Midland) Division was a Territorial Force division ... Originally called the 'South Midland Division', it was redesignated as the 48th Division in 1915 ... During the Second World War it was named the 48th (South Midland) Infantry Division ...
45th Parallel South
... The 45th parallel south is a circle of latitude that is 45 degrees south of the Earth's equatorial plane ... halfway point between the equator and the South Pole ... The true halfway point is 16.2 kilometres (10.1 mi) south of this parallel because the Earth is not a perfect sphere but bulges at the equator and is flattened at the poles.) Unlike its northern counterpart ...
Indian South Africans - History - Post-apartheid - Renewed South Asian Immigration
... See also Pakistanis in South Africa Following the end of apartheid, a new wave of South Asian immigration commenced from both India, and Pakistan, paralleling the movement ...
4-4-0 - Usage - Australia
... The first 4-4-0s appeared in South Australia in 1859 ... driving wheels, worked in Victoria, New South Wales, Western Australia and Tasmania on 3 ft 6 in (1,067 mm) Cape gauge, 4 ft 8 1⁄2 in (1,435 mm) Standard gauge and 5 ft 3 ... in Gawler, South Australia, and the Phoenix Foundry in Ballarat, Victoria ...

Famous quotes containing the words africans, indian and/or south:

    Where do whites fit in the New Africa? Nowhere, I’m inclined to say ... and I do believe that it is true that even the gentlest and most westernised Africans would like the emotional idea of the continent entirely without the complication of the presence of the white man for a generation or two. But nowhere, as an answer for us whites, is in the same category as remarks like What’s the use of living? in the face of the threat of atomic radiation. We are living; we are in Africa.
    Nadine Gordimer (b. 1923)

    We had not gone far before I was startled by seeing what I thought was an Indian encampment, covered with a red flag, on the bank, and exclaimed, “Camp!” to my comrades. I was slow to discover that it was a red maple changed by the frost.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    I don’t have any doubts that there will be a place for progressive white people in this country in the future. I think the paranoia common among white people is very unfounded. I have always organized my life so that I could focus on political work. That’s all I want to do, and that’s all that makes me happy.
    Hettie V., South African white anti-apartheid activist and feminist. As quoted in Lives of Courage, ch. 21, by Diana E. H. Russell (1989)