HP-IL - Principles

Principles

The HP-IL can be seen as a precursor to the Universal Serial Bus now largely in use on desktop computers. However, as its name implies, the cable formed a loop: the cable originated in the HP-IL extension module, ran through all connected devices, then came back to the module.

On the bus, devices could act as controllers (the calculators/computers) or slaves (the peripherals). Certain controllers like the HP-71 module or the HP82973A ISA interface could act as slaves as well, enabling a small network of calculators to be set up.

The IL used a form of Token passing protocol for media access control.

Every device on the bus has a ring-in and a ring-out connector, either on pigtails or built in. HP used a proprietary two-pin connector design with polarizing "D"-shaped shells. HP-IL cables can be interconnected without further adapters to extend their length.

Read more about this topic:  HP-IL

Other articles related to "principles":

National Medal Of Technology And Innovation - Laureates
... of Industrial Engineering and Management Science, on the principles of technology commercialization." 1990 Fred W ... Juran "For his lifetime work of providing the key principles and methods by which enterprises manage the quality of their products and processes, enhancing their ability to compete in the global ... systems theory and technology, statistical methods and management principles that define the Total Quality Management approach for achieving performance excellence and ...
List Of Nikola Tesla Patents - American - Patents #1–#50
... of energy Simple construction Easier construction Rotating magnetic field principles ... and the obedience to the energizing circuit and stator Construction and organization principles ... Electric Machines - 1889 December 24 - Construction principles of the armature for electrical generators and motors Simple and economical Coils of insulated conducting wire (or ribbon) may be wound or ...

Famous quotes containing the word principles:

    The proposition that Muslims are welcome in Britain if, and only if, they stop behaving like Muslims is a doctrine which is incompatible with the principles that guide a free society.
    Roy Hattersley (b. 1932)

    Prohibition will work great injury to the cause of temperance. It is a species of intemperance within itself, for it goes beyond the bounds of reason in that it attempts to control a man’s appetite by legislation, and makes a crime out of things that are not crimes. A Prohibition law strikes a blow at the very principles upon which our government was founded.
    Abraham Lincoln (1809–1865)

    It seems to me that man is made to act rather than to know: the principles of things escape our most persevering researches.
    Frederick The Great (1712–1786)