History of Quantum Field Theory

The history of quantum field theory starts with its creation by Paul Dirac, when he attempted to quantize the electromagnetic field in the late 1920s. Major advances in the theory were made in the 1950s, and led to the introduction of quantum electrodynamics (QED). QED was so successful and "natural" that efforts were made to use the same basic concepts to the other forces of nature. These efforts were successful in the application of gauge theory to the strong nuclear force and weak nuclear force, producing the modern standard model of particle physics. Efforts to describe gravity using the same techniques have, to date, failed. The study of quantum field theory is alive and flourishing, as are applications of this method to many physical problems. It remains one of the most vital areas of theoretical physics today, providing a common language to many branches of physics.

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