History of Elementary Algebra

History Of Elementary Algebra

Algebra is a branch of mathematics concerning the study of structure, relation, and quantity. Elementary algebra is the branch that deals with solving for the operands of arithmetic equations. Modern or abstract algebra has its origins as an abstraction of elementary algebra. Some historians believe that the earliest mathematical research was done by the priest classes of ancient civilizations, such as the Babylonians, to go along with religious rituals. The origins of algebra can thus be traced back to ancient Babylonian mathematicians roughly four thousand years ago.

Read more about History Of Elementary AlgebraEtymology, Babylonian Algebra, Egyptian Algebra, Greek Geometric Algebra, Chinese Algebra, Diophantine Algebra, Indian Algebra, Islamic Algebra, Modern Algebra, The Father of Algebra

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History Of Elementary Algebra - The Father of Algebra
... The Hellenistic mathematician Diophantus has traditionally been known as "the father of algebra" but debate now exists as to whether or not Al-Khwarizmi deserves this ... Those who support Diophantus point to the fact that the algebra found in Al-Jabr is more elementary than the algebra found in Arithmetica and that ... solution of quadratic equations with positive roots, and was the first to teach algebra in an elementary form and for its own sake, whereas Diophantus was primarily concerned with the ...

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