Hamiltonian Path Problem

In the mathematical field of graph theory the Hamiltonian path problem and the Hamiltonian cycle problem are problems of determining whether a Hamiltonian path or a Hamiltonian cycle exists in a given graph (whether directed or undirected). Both problems are NP-complete.

Read more about Hamiltonian Path ProblemRelation Between Problems, Algorithms, Complexity

Other articles related to "hamiltonian path problem, problem, hamiltonian, path, problems":

Hamiltonian Path Problem - Complexity
... The problem of finding a Hamiltonian cycle or path is in FNP the analogous decision problem is to test whether a Hamiltonian cycle or path exists ... The directed and undirected Hamiltonian cycle problems were two of Karp's 21 NP-complete problems. 3-regular bipartite planar graphs must always contain a Hamiltonian cycle, in which case the problem restricted to those graphs could not be NP-complete see Barnette's conjecture ...
Obturator Nerve - Path
... Here it enters the thigh, through the obturator canal, and divides into an anterior and a posterior branch, which are separated at first by some of the fibers of the Obturator externus, and lower down by the Adductor brevis. ...
Grit Fell
... The path from Jubilee Tower car park in the south is difficult and treacherous, with sheer sided bogs 6 feet deep ... The path from Clougha Pike in the west is better, but still contains bogs crossed by the odd plank of wood ... The path from Ward's Stone is the most treacherous of all ...
North Hinksey - Local Topography
... The most notable path between Oxford and North Hinksey is a metalled bridleway and cycle track variously known as Willow Walk and Ruskin's Ride ... This path was built in 1876–77 by Aubrey Harcourt (1852–1904), a major local landowner, but not open to the public until 1922 ... There is also a smaller unmade path which begins alongside the large back garden of The Fishes and crosses Hinksey Stream by a bridge at the site of the old ferry ...

Famous quotes containing the words problem and/or path:

    A curious thing about the ontological problem is its simplicity. It can be put in three Anglo-Saxon monosyllables: ‘What is there?’ It can be answered, moveover, in a word—‘Everything.’
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    So long as you are praised think only that you are not yet on your own path but on that of another.
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