Embryonic Stem Cell Research Oversight Committees

Embryonic Stem Cell Research Oversight Committees

The National Academies called for the establishment of Embryonic Stem Cell Research Oversight (ESCRO) Committees in its 2005 Guidelines for Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research to manage the ethical and legal concerns in human embryonic stem cell research. Because of the complexity and novelty of many of the issues involved in that research, the Guidelines committee believes that all research institutions engaged in human embryonic stem cell research should create and maintain these committees at the local level.

The composition and responsibilities of ESCRO committees was further clarified in the Amendments to the National Academies' Guidelines for Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research, released in February 2007.

Read more about Embryonic Stem Cell Research Oversight CommitteesOrganization, Composition, Responsibilities

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Embryonic Stem Cell Research Oversight Committees - Responsibilities
... The Guidelines assigns several responsibilities to ESCRO committees provide oversight over all issues related to derivation and use of hES cell lines review and approve the scientific ...

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