Eleanor Roosevelt

Eleanor Roosevelt

Anna Eleanor Roosevelt (/ˈɛlɨnɔr ˈroʊzəvɛlt/; October 11, 1884 – November 7, 1962) was the longest-serving First Lady of the United States, holding the post from 1933 to 1945. She supported the New Deal policies of her husband, distant cousin Franklin Delano Roosevelt, and became an advocate for civil rights. After her husband's death in 1945, Roosevelt continued to be an international author, speaker, politician, and activist for the New Deal coalition. She worked to enhance the status of working women, although she opposed the Equal Rights Amendment because she believed it would adversely affect women.

In the 1940s, Roosevelt was one of the co-founders of Freedom House and supported the formation of the United Nations. Roosevelt founded the UN Association of the United States in 1943 to advance support for the formation of the UN. She was a delegate to the UN General Assembly from 1945 and 1952, a job for which she was appointed by President Harry S. Truman and confirmed by the United States Senate. During her time at the United Nations she chaired the committee that drafted and approved the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. President Truman called her the "First Lady of the World" in tribute to her human rights achievements.

Active in politics for the rest of her life, Roosevelt chaired the John F. Kennedy administration's ground-breaking committee which helped start second-wave feminism, the Presidential Commission on the Status of Women. In 1999, she was ranked in the top ten of Gallup's List of Most Widely Admired People of the 20th Century.

Read more about Eleanor Roosevelt:  Public Life Before The White House, First Lady of The United States (1933–1945), Years After The White House, Honors and Awards, Later Private Life, Death

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Death - Eleanor Roosevelt Memorial
... A memorial to Roosevelt, dedicated in 1996, was built at the southern end of New York's Riverside Park, at the corner of 72nd Street and Riverside Drive ... A bronze statue of Roosevelt at the center of a circular plant bed is the memorial's principal feature ...
Douglass (Memphis) - Education - First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt Visited Douglass School
... Eleanor Roosevelt came to make a first-hand visit to observe the Live-at-Home total program ... First Lady Roosevelt put it in plain words, “There is nothing southern about Memphis! We stopped at a Negro school built by WPA labor where the NYA ...
List Of Children Of The Presidents Of The United States - Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt
... Child Lifetime Spouse Notes Anna Eleanor Roosevelt 1906–1975 Curtis Bean Dall Mother of Anna Eleanor Roosevelt (1927–present) Curtis Roosevelt (1930–present) Clarence John Boettiger Mother of John Roosevelt ... Owens Mary Lena Winskill Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Jr. 1909 no spouse died as an infant Elliott Roosevelt 1910–1990 Elizabeth Browning Donner Father of William Donner Roosevelt (1932–2003) Ruth Josephine Googins Father of Ruth Chandler Roosevelt (Lindsley) (1934–p ...
My Day
... My Day was a newspaper column that was written by first lady Eleanor Roosevelt six days a week from 1935 to 1962 ... Roosevelt to spread her ideas and thoughts to millions of Americans and give them a new view on the issues they faced every day ... Bye, Eleanor Roosevelt's literary agent, encouraged her to write the column ...
Lorena Hickok - Legacy
... Hickok wrote several books, co-authoring "Ladies of Courage" with Eleanor Roosevelt in 1954, and following that with "The Story of Franklin D ... Roosevelt," (1956), "The Story of Helen Keller" (1958), "The Story of Eleanor Roosevelt" (1959), and several more. 1978, Doris Faber, as part of research for a projected short biography of Eleanor Roosevelt, became perhaps the first person outside the National Archives to open these boxes, and was astounded ...

Famous quotes by eleanor roosevelt:

    A trait no other nation seems to possess in quite the same degree that we do—namely, a feeling of almost childish injury and resentment unless the world as a whole recognizes how innocent we are of anything but the most generous and harmless intentions.
    Eleanor Roosevelt (1884–1962)

    You can never really live anyone else’s life, not even your child’s. The influence you exert is through your own life, and what you’ve become yourself.
    Eleanor Roosevelt (1884–1962)

    I think, at a child’s birth, if a mother could ask a fairy godmother to endow it with the most useful gift, that gift would be curiosity.
    Eleanor Roosevelt (1884–1962)

    ... the next war will be a war in which people not armies will suffer, and our boasted, hard-earned civilization will do us no good. Cannot the women rise to this great opportunity and work now, and not have the double horror, if another war comes, of losing their loved ones, and knowing that they lifted no finger when they might have worked hard?
    Eleanor Roosevelt (1884–1962)

    This is ... a trait no other nation seems to possess in quite the same degree that we do—namely, a feeling of almost childish injury and resentment unless the world as a whole recognizes how innocent we are of anything but the most generous and harmless intentions.
    Eleanor Roosevelt (1884–1962)