Cultural Depictions of The Salem Witch Trials

Cultural depictions of the Salem witch trials abound in art, literature and popular media in the United States, from the early 19th century to the present day. The literature and some televisual depictions are discussed in Marion Gibson's Witchcraft Myths in American Culture (New York: Routledge, 2007) and see also Bernard Rosenthal's Salem Story: Reading the Witch Trials of 1692 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1995).

Read more about Cultural Depictions Of The Salem Witch TrialsThe Salem Witch Trials in Literature, Collectibles, 19th Century Illustrations Depicting The Episode, 19th and 20th Century Photographs of 17th Century Buildings Related To The Episode

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Cultural Depictions Of The Salem Witch Trials - 19th and 20th Century Photographs of 17th Century Buildings Related To The Episode
... Although a few of the houses that belonged to the participants in the Salem witch trials are still standing, many of these buildings have been lost ...

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