Competitive Diving - Competitive Diving

Competitive Diving

Most diving competitions consist of three disciplines: 1 m and 3 m springboards, and the platform. Competitive athletes are divided by gender, and often by age group. In platform events, competitors are allowed to perform their dives on either the five, seven and a half (generally just called seven) or ten meter towers. In major diving meets, including the Olympic Games and the World Championships, platform diving is from the 10 meter height.

Divers have to perform a set number of dives according to established requirements, including somersaults and twists. Divers are judged on whether and how well they completed all aspects of the dive, the conformance of their body to the requirements of the dive, and the amount of splash created by their entry to the water. A possible score out of ten is broken down into three points for the takeoff, three for the flight, and three for the entry, with one more available to give the judges flexibility.

The raw score is multiplied by a difficulty factor, derived from the number and combination of movements attempted. The diver with the highest total score after a sequence of dives is declared the winner.

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Other articles related to "competitive diving, diving, competitive":

Bob Webster - Competitive Diving
... A native of California, he won his first collegiate diving title for Santa Ana Junior College, a school that did not have a pool ... third place finishes at the conference and state swimming and diving competitions ... Lee said, "Diving-wise, he was the greatest competitor I've ever coached ...
Competitive Diving - Non-competitive Diving
... Diving is also popular as a non-competitive activity ... Such diving usually emphasizes the airborne experience, and the height of the dive, but does not emphasize what goes on once the diver enters the water ... Such non-competitive diving can occur indoors and outdoors ...

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