Coat of Arms of The Moldavian Autonomous Soviet Socialist Republic - History - Late 1930s

Late 1930s

On 12 July 1936 the draft of the new Constitution of the Soviet Union appeared in the newspapers. It was approved locally by the VIIth extraordinary Congress of the soviets of the Moldavian ASSR, whose work started on 18 November 1936 at Tiraspol. The Congress established a committee that would elaborate the future Moldavian Constitution. On 5 December 1936 the Constitution of the Soviet Union became effective. A month later, the VIIth extraordinary Congress of the soviets of the Moldavian ASSR resumed its work and on 6 January 1937 adopted the new Constitution of the Moldavian ASSR.

According to the Constitution, the coat of arms of the autonomous republic was supposed to coincide with the soviet socialist republic that it was part of. The only additions were the name of the Moldavian ASSR and the communist slogan "Workers of the world, unite!" in the Moldavian and Ukrainian languages on the ribbon. Chapter X of the new Constitution, entitled "The coat of arms, the flag, the capital," stated in Article 111: "The coat of arms of the Moldavian Autonomous Soviet Socialist Republic is the coat of arms of the Ukrainian SSR, which is composed of a golden hammer and sickle on a red background in the rays of the sun, surrounded by wheat ears, with the inscriptions "RSSU" and "Workers of the world, unite!" in the Ukrainian and Moldavian languages, with the addition, under "RSSU" inscription, in smaller letters, of the inscription "Moldavian ASSR" in the Ukrainian and Moldavian languages."

This coat of arms ceased to be valid on the disbanding of the Moldavian ASSR, on 2 August 1940.

Read more about this topic:  Coat Of Arms Of The Moldavian Autonomous Soviet Socialist Republic, History

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    No such sermons have come to us here out of England, in late years, as those of this preacher,—sermons to kings, and sermons to peasants, and sermons to all intermediate classes. It is in vain that John Bull, or any of his cousins, turns a deaf ear, and pretends not to hear them: nature will not soon be weary of repeating them. There are words less obviously true, more for the ages to hear, perhaps, but none so impossible for this age not to hear.
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