Amateur Radio Frequency Allocations

Amateur Radio Frequency Allocations

Amateur radio frequency allocation is done by national telecommunications authorities. Globally, the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) oversees how much radio spectrum is set aside for amateur radio transmissions. Individual amateur stations are free to use any frequency within authorized frequency ranges; authorized bands may vary by the class of the station license.

Radio amateurs use a variety of transmission modes, including Morse code, radioteletype, data, and voice. Specific frequency allocations vary from country to country and between ITU regions as specified in the current ITU HF frequency allocations for amateur radio. The modes and types of allocations within each range of frequencies is called a bandplan, and may be set by international agreements, national regulations, or agreements between amateur radio operators.

National authorities regulate amateur usage of radio bands. Some bands may not be available or may have restrictions on usage in certain countries or regions. International agreements assign amateur radio bands which differ by region.

Read more about Amateur Radio Frequency AllocationsITU Region 1, ITU Region 2, ITU Region 3, Space Operations

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Amateur Radio Frequency Allocations - Space Operations
... See also amateur radio satellite Radio amateurs may engage in satellite and space craft communications however, the frequencies allowed for such activities are allocated ... Under the International Telecommunication Union's rules, all amateur radio operations may only occur within 50 kilometres (31 mi) of the Earth's surface ... As such, the Amateur Radio Service is not permitted to engage in satellite operations however, a sister radio service, called the Amateur Satellite Service, exists which allows satellite operations for the ...

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