What is cap?

  • (noun): Something serving as a cover or protection.
    See also — Additional definitions below

Cap

A cap is a form of headgear. Caps have crowns that fit very close to the head and have no brim or only a visor. They are typically designed for warmth and, when including a visor, blocking sunlight from the eyes. They come in many shapes and sizes.

Read more about Cap.

Some articles on cap:

Types of Caps
... Ascot cap Ayam Balmoral Baseball cap Beanie (North America) Beret Biretta Cap of Maintenance Casquette Caubeen Caul Coif Combination cap (also known as a service cap) Coppola Cricket cap Do-rag ...

More definitions of "cap":

  • (noun): Dental appliance consisting of an artificial crown for a tooth.
    Synonyms: crownwork
  • (noun): An upper limit on what is allowed.
    Example: "They established a cap for prices"
    Synonyms: ceiling
  • (noun): A fruiting structure resembling an umbrella that forms the top of a stalked fleshy fungus such as a mushroom.
    Synonyms: pileus
  • (noun): A tight-fitting headdress.
  • (verb): Lie at the top of.
    Synonyms: crest
  • (noun): The upper part of a column that supports the entablature.
    Synonyms: capital, chapiter
  • (noun): A top (as for a bottle).
  • (verb): Restrict the number or amount of.
    Example: "We had to cap the number of people we can accept into our club"
  • (noun): A mechanical or electrical explosive device or a small amount of explosive; can be used to initiate the reaction of a disrupting explosive.
    Synonyms: detonator, detonating device

Famous quotes containing the word cap:

    In time your relatives will come to accept the idea that a career is as important to you as your family. Of course, in time the polar ice cap will melt.
    Barbara Dale (b. 1940)

    I put a Phrygian cap on the old dictionary.
    Victor Hugo (1802–1885)

    ‘I have cap and bells,’ he pondered,
    ‘I will send them to her and die’;
    And when the morning whitened
    He left them where she went by.
    William Butler Yeats (1865–1939)