Trench, Telford - Canal Inclined Plane

Canal Inclined Plane

It was once the site of an inclined plane connecting the now-abandoned Shrewsbury Canal and a smaller canal, the Wombridge Canal, 75 feet (23 m) higher in elevation and part of the east Shropshire canal network. The Trench Inclined Plane ceased operations in 1921 having been built in 1793. It was the last working canal inclined plane in the United Kingdom.Trench was also famous in the 60s and 70s for its treacle mines which are now closed.Trench had the largest seam of treacle in Europe bringing work to many people in the local area.

The town is also a stronghold for supporters of Wolverhampton Wanderers with a bus travelling to all Wolves away games picking up at Trench, see telfordwolves.com

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Other articles related to "canal inclined plane, canal, inclined plane":

Canal Inclined Plane - Other Examples - Without Caissons
... on the Trent-and-Severn-Waterway in Canada Bude Canal in Cornwall Dahme Flood Relief Canal at Märkisch Buchholz in Germany Elbląg Canal between Elbląg and Ostróda in Poland Hay Inclined Plane in the ... Columb Canal built by John Edyvean Trench inclined plane on the Shrewsbury Canal, Shropshire Underground inclined plane in the Worsley Navigable Levels ...

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