Socket Wrench - Description

Description

The socket wrench typically is of the ratchet type. The ratcheting mechanism allows the nut to be tightened or loosened with a reciprocating motion, without requiring that the wrench be removed and refitted after each turn. Typically, a small lever on the ratchet head switches the wrench between tightening and loosening mode. The sockets are attached to the ratchet through a square fitting that contains a spring-loaded ball detent mechanism to keep the sockets in place. These drive fittings come in four common sizes: 1/4 inch, 3/8 inch, 1/2 inch, and 3/4 inch (referred to as drives, as in "3/8 drive"). Despite being denominated in inches, these are international standards and no metric counterparts exist. Larger drive sizes such as 1 inch and above are usually reserved for use on fasteners of larger industrial equipment, such as tractor-trailers (articulated lorries), large cargo aircraft and passenger airliners, and marine work (merchant fleets, navies, shipyards). The sockets themselves come in a full range of inch and metric sizes. ("SAE" is often used as a blanket term for the nonmetric sizes, despite the technical inaccuracy of that usage.) The advantages of the system of a ratchet wrench with indexable sockets are speed of wrenching (it is much faster than a conventional wrench, especially in repetitive bolt-on or bolt-off usage) and efficiency of tooling cost and portability (it is much more efficient than a set of nonratcheting wrenches, with every size head having its own handle).

Read more about this topic:  Socket Wrench

Other articles related to "description":

Meta Element Used in Search Engine Optimization - The description Attribute
... Unlike the keywords attribute, the description attribute is supported by most major search engines, like Yahoo! and Bing, while Google will fall back on this tag when ... The description attribute provides a concise explanation of a Web page's content ... This allows the Web page authors to give a more meaningful description for listings than might be displayed if the search engine was unable to ...
Universal Description Discovery And Integration
... Universal Description, Discovery and Integration (UDDI, pronounced Yu-diː) is a platform-independent, Extensible Markup Language (XML)-based registry by which businesses worldwide can list ... to be interrogated by SOAP messages and to provide access to Web Services Description Language (WSDL) documents describing the protocol bindings and message formats ...
Gerald Of Wales - Natural History
... He gives a vivid and accurate description of the last colony of the European Beaver in Wales on the River Teifi, but spoils it by repeating the legend that beavers castrate themselves to avoid ... Likewise he gives a good description of an Osprey fishing, but adds the mythical detail that the bird has one webbed foot ... His description of Irish wildlife was harshly called "worthless" the better view perhaps is that despite its faults it gives a valuable glimpse of Irish fauna in the 1180s ...
Essay - Forms and Styles - Descriptive
... the audience, creating a dominant impression, using descriptive language, and organizing the description are the rhetorical choices to be considered when using a description ... A description is usually arranged spatially but can also be chronological or emphatic ... The focus of a description is the scene ...

Famous quotes containing the word description:

    Once a child has demonstrated his capacity for independent functioning in any area, his lapses into dependent behavior, even though temporary, make the mother feel that she is being taken advantage of....What only yesterday was a description of the child’s stage in life has become an indictment, a judgment.
    Elaine Heffner (20th century)

    He hath achieved a maid
    That paragons description and wild fame;
    One that excels the quirks of blazoning pens.
    William Shakespeare (1564–1616)

    An intentional object is given by a word or a phrase which gives a description under which.
    Gertrude Elizabeth Margaret Anscombe (b. 1919)