Shroud of Turin

The Shroud of Turin or Turin Shroud (Italian: Sindone di Torino, Sacra Sindone) is a linen cloth bearing the image of a man who appears to have suffered physical trauma in a manner consistent with crucifixion. It is kept in the royal chapel of the Cathedral of Saint John the Baptist in Turin, northern Italy. The image on the shroud is commonly associated with Jesus Christ, his crucifixion and burial. It is much clearer in black-and-white negative than in its natural sepia color. The negative image was first observed in 1898, on the reverse photographic plate of amateur photographer Secondo Pia, who was allowed to photograph it while it was being exhibited in the Turin Cathedral.

The origins of the shroud and its image are the subject of intense debate among scientists, theologians, historians and researchers. Scientific and popular publications have presented diverse arguments for both authenticity and possible methods of forgery. A variety of scientific theories regarding the shroud have since been proposed, based on disciplines ranging from chemistry to biology and medical forensics to optical image analysis. The Catholic Church has neither formally endorsed nor rejected the shroud, but in 1958 Pope Pius XII approved of the image in association with the Roman Catholic devotion to the Holy Face of Jesus.

In 1978, a detailed examination was carried out by a team of American scientists called STURP. STURP found no reliable evidence of forgery, and called the question of how the image was formed "a mystery". In 1988 a radiocarbon dating test was performed on small samples of the shroud. The laboratories at the University of Oxford, the University of Arizona, and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, concurred that the samples they tested dated from the Middle Ages, between 1260 and 1390. In 2008 a former STURP member stated that sample was representative of the whole shroud.

Since 2005, at least four articles have been published in scholarly sources stating that the samples used for the dating test may not have been representative of the whole Shroud. According to former Nature editor Philip Ball, "it's fair to say that, despite the seemingly definitive tests in 1988, the status of the Shroud of Turin is murkier than ever. Not least, the nature of the image and how it was fixed on the cloth remain deeply puzzling". The shroud continues to remain one of the most studied and controversial artifacts in human history.

Read more about Shroud Of Turin:  Description, History, Religious Perspective, Scientific Perspective, Recent Developments

Other articles related to "shroud of turin, shroud, turin":

Christian Relics - Shrouds and Faces - Shroud of Turin
... The Shroud of Turin is the best-known relic of Jesus and one of the most studied artifacts in human history ... Various tests have been performed on the shroud, yet both believers and skeptics continue to present arguments for and against the validity of the tests ... issues is the Radiocarbon dating in 1988 which yielded results indicating that the shroud was made during the Middle Ages ...
Anastasio Ballestrero - Shroud of Turin
... Ballestrero initially agreed to scientific testing being performed on the Shroud of Turin in 1978, but refused to permit radiocarbon dating testing ... announced on October 13 of that same year, that the shroud was dated from the Middle Ages and thus not the actual burial cloth of Christ although these tests were later ...
Shroud Of Turin - Recent Developments
... The image was made by taking the image of the Turin Shroud and transforming it onto a 3D form to compose and inspire a CGI image of a detailed face ... The Shroud was placed back on public display (the 18th time in its history) in Turin from 10 April to 23 May 2010 ... According to Church officials, more than 2 million visitors came to see the Shroud ...

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