Scale

Scale may refer to:

Read more about Scale:  Length, Mathematics, Music, People, Representation Systems, In Biology, Other

Other articles related to "scale, scales":

Diseconomies Of Scale
... Diseconomies of scale are the forces that cause larger firms and governments to produce goods and services at increased per-unit costs ... The concept is the opposite of economies of scale ...
Scale - Other
... Weighing scale, an instrument used to measure weight or mass Libra (constellation), also known as "the scales" Scale insect, small, often parasitic, insects that feed off of plants Fouling, buildup of unwanted ...
Planck Scale
... In particle physics and physical cosmology, the Planck scale is an energy scale around 1.22 × 1019 GeV (which corresponds by the mass–energy equivalence to the Planck mass 2.17645 ... At this scale, the description of sub-atomic particle interactions in terms of quantum field theory breaks down, due to the apparent non-renormalizability of ... For energies approaching the Planck scale, a new theory of quantum gravity is required, and the current leading approaches are string theory and M-theory ...
Polymer Physics - Flexibility
... Whether a polymer is flexible or not depends on the scale of interest ... Looking at length scale smaller than 50 nm (Known as the McGuinness limit), it behaves more or less like a rigid rod ... At length scale much larger than 50 nm, it behaves like a flexible chain ...
Neonatal Behavioral Assessment Scale
... The Neonatal Behavioral Assessment Scale (NBAS),also known as the Brazleton Neonatal Assessment Scale (BNAS), was developed in 1973 by Dr ... The Brazleton scale produces a total of 47 scores, of which 27 are behaviorial related and 20 are elicited responses ... are all assessed." The consequential validity of the Brazleton scale has been very favorable, providing a considerable research base ...

Famous quotes containing the word scale:

    I by no means rank poetry high in the scale of intelligence—this may look like affectation but it is my real opinion. It is the lava of the imagination whose eruption prevents an earthquake.
    George Gordon Noel Byron (1788–1824)

    There is something in us, somehow, that, in the most degraded condition, we snatch at a chance to deceive ourselves into a fancied superiority to others, whom we suppose lower in the scale than ourselves.
    Herman Melville (1819–1891)

    The Humanity of men and women is inversely proportional to their Numbers. A Crowd is no more human than an Avalanche or a Whirlwind. A rabble of men and women stands lower in the scale of moral and intellectual being than a herd of Swine or of Jackals.
    Aldous Huxley (1894–1963)