Red Sea Species

Some articles on species, red sea, sea, red seas, red sea species:

Lessepsian Migration
... Erythrean invasion) is the ongoing migration of marine species across the Suez Canal, usually from the Red Sea to the Mediterranean Sea, more rarely in the opposite direction. 1869 created the first salt-water passage between the Mediterranean and Red seas ... The Red Sea is higher than the Eastern Mediterranean, so the canal serves as a tidal strait that pours Red Sea water into the Mediterranean ...
Suez Canal - Environmental Impact
... Suez Canal in 1869 created the first salt-water passage between the Mediterranean and Red seas ... Although the Red Sea is about 1.2 m (4 ft) higher than the eastern Mediterranean, the current between the Mediterranean and the middle of the canal at ... The Bitter Lakes, which were hypersaline natural lakes, blocked the migration of Red Sea species into the Mediterranean for many decades, but as the salinity of the lakes ...
Mediterranean Sea - Environmental Threats - Biodiversity - Invasive Species
... salt-water passage between the Mediterranean and Red Sea ... The Red Sea is higher than the Eastern Mediterranean, so the canal serves as a tidal strait that pours Red Sea water into the Mediterranean ... natural lakes that form part of the canal, blocked the migration of Red Sea species into the Mediterranean for many decades, but as the salinity of the ...

Famous quotes containing the words species, red and/or sea:

    A man, to be greatly good, must imagine intensely and comprehensively; he must put himself in the place of another and of many others; the pains and pleasures of his species must become his own.
    Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792–1822)

    Oh we drunk his “Hale” in the good red wine
    When we last made company,
    No capon priest was the Goodly Fere
    But a man o’ men was he.
    Ezra Pound (1885–1972)

    My position is a naturalistic one; I see philosophy not as an a priori propaedeutic or groundwork for science, but as continuous with science. I see philosophy and science as in the same boat—a boat which, to revert to Neurath’s figure as I so often do, we can rebuild only at sea while staying afloat in it. There is no external vantage point, no first philosophy.
    Willard Van Orman Quine (b. 1908)