Pushkin

Some articles on pushkin:

Stanley Mitchell - Life and Works
... Novel in 1962, Walter Benjamin, Understanding Brecht in 2003, and Alexander Pushkin ... His life's work was a translation into English verse of Pushkin's Russian verse novel Eugene Onegin, commenced in 1966 and published in 2008 ... meaning, but also the wit, the grace and the constantly varying intonations of Pushkin's voice ...
The Gypsies (poem) - Sources
... (1982) Alexander Pushkin A Critical Study Duckworth London ... (2006) "Pushkin in music" in The Cambridge Companion to Pushkin, ed ... Royal Opera House Covent Garden, 1984 Pushkin, A.S ...
Pushkin Studies
... The Pushkin studies is the branch of literary criticism which researches the life and works of Aleksandr Pushkin ... Aleksandr Dolinin divides the Pushkin studies in Russia into the Saint Petersburg and Moscow currents ... Instead he testifies the vigorous wave of Pushkin studies in 1910-1940s ...
Pushkin, Saint Petersburg - Sister Cities
... Pushkin is twinned with the following sister cities Athens, Greece Annapolis, United States Bitola, Macedonia, since 2005 Brunswick, Germany Valance, France ...
The Bronze Horseman (poem) - Sources and Inspiration
... Pushkin was not the first to feel the statue's ambiguity in a travelogue about Petersburg in 1821, the French statesman Joseph de Maistre commented that he did not know "whether Peter's bronze ... Pushkin's poem opens with a brief foreword stating that the events he depicted are based on reality ... There was also a literary precedent for poetry describing the city of Petersburg Pushkin's own footnotes to "The Bronze Horseman" refer to a poem by Petr Viazemskii which includes admiring verses about the city, "Con ...

Famous quotes containing the word pushkin:

    There yet remains but one concluding tale,
    And then this chronicle of mine is ended—
    Fulfilled, the duty God ordained to me,
    A sinner. Not without purpose did the Lord
    Put me to witness much for many years
    And educate me in the love of books.
    One day some indefatigable monk
    Will find my conscientious, unsigned work;
    Like me, he will light up his ikon-lamp
    And, shaking from the scroll the age-old dust,
    He will transcribe these tales in all their truth.
    —Alexander Pushkin (1799–1837)

    ‘Tis time, my friend, ‘tis time!
    For rest the heart is aching;
    Days follow days in flight, and every day is taking
    Fragments of being, while together you and I
    Make plans to live. Look, all is dust, and we shall die.
    —Alexander Pushkin (1799–1837)