Plant Viruses

Some articles on plant viruses, viruses, plants, plant:

Transmission of Plant Viruses - Insects
... Plant viruses need to be transmitted by a vector, most often insects such as leafhoppers ... One class of viruses, the Rhabdoviridae, has been proposed to actually be insect viruses that have evolved to replicate in plants ... The chosen insect vector of a plant virus will often be the determining factor in that virus's host range it can only infect plants that the insect vector feeds upon ...
History Of Virology - Plant Viruses
... Adolf Mayer (1843–1942) described a condition of tobacco plants, which he called "mosaic disease" ("mozaïkziekte") ... The diseased plants had variegated leaves that were mottled ... as a virus disease, virus infections of many other plants were discovered ...
Diagnostic Techniques For Detection of Potato Virus Y - ELISA
... The resulting plants were inspected for a more accurate estimate of viral status ... a quick, effective and sensitive method of screening for a wide range of potato plant viruses ... As a result the DAS-ELISA principle is commonly employed in ELISA’s for the detection of plant pathogens in plant sap without prior purification of the pathogen ...
Mycovirus - Origin and Evolution
... from the ‘RNA world’ as both types of RNA viruses infect bacteria as well as eukaryotes (Forterre, 2006) ... Although the origin of viruses is still not well understood, Koonin (2008) recently presented data which suggest that viruses invaded the emerging ‘supergroups’ of eukaryotes from an ancestral ... According to Koonin, RNA viruses colonized eukaryotes first and subsequently co-evolved with their hosts ...
Phytopathology - Plant Pathogens - Viruses, Viroids and Virus-like Organisms
... There are many types of plant virus, and some are even asymptomatic ... Under normal circumstances, plant viruses cause only a loss of crop yield ... Most plant viruses have small, single-stranded RNA genomes ...

Famous quotes containing the word plant:

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