Photography - Technical Aspects

Technical Aspects

Main article: Camera

The camera is the image-forming device, and photographic film or a silicon electronic image sensor is the sensing medium. The respective recording medium can be the film itself, or a digital electronic or magnetic memory.

Photographers control the camera and lens to "expose" the light recording material (such as film) to the required amount of light to form a "latent image" (on film) or RAW file (in digital cameras) which, after appropriate processing, is converted to a usable image. Digital cameras use an electronic image sensor based on light-sensitive electronics such as charge-coupled device (CCD) or complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology. The resulting digital image is stored electronically, but can be reproduced on paper or film.

The camera (or 'camera obscura') is a dark room or chamber from which, as far as possible, all light is excluded except the light that forms the image. The subject being photographed, however, must be illuminated. Cameras can range from small to very large, a whole room that is kept dark while the object to be photographed is in another room where it is properly illuminated. This was common for reproduction photography of flat copy when large film negatives were used (see Process camera).

A general principle known from the birth of photography is that the smaller the camera, the brighter the image. This meant that as soon as photographic materials became sensitive enough (fast enough) to take candid or what were called genre pictures, small detective cameras were used, some of them disguised as a tie pin that was really a lens, as a piece of luggage or even a pocket watch (the Ticka camera).

The movie camera is a type of photographic camera which takes a rapid sequence of photographs on strips of film. In contrast to a still camera, which captures a single snapshot at a time, the movie camera takes a series of images, each called a "frame". This is accomplished through an intermittent mechanism. The frames are later played back in a movie projector at a specific speed, called the "frame rate" (number of frames per second). While viewing, a person's eyes and brain merge the separate pictures together to create the illusion of motion.

Read more about this topic:  Photography

Other articles related to "technical aspects":

An Inconvenient Truth - Background - Production - Technical Aspects
... While the bulk of the film was shot on 444 HDCAM, according to director Guggenheim, a vast array of different film formats were used "There’s 35mm and 16mm ... A lot of the stuff on the farm I just shot myself on 8mm film ...
The Colosseum At Caesars Palace - Background - Technical Aspects
... The stage itself includes ten motorized stage lifts, which compose 75 percent of the stage ... Unlike the Colosseum in Rome, the theatre was built in an intimate setting, with the furthest seating being 120 ft (37 m) from the stage ...
LAN-free Backup - Technical Aspects
... It comes in different flavours with backup server in addition to a shared storage device (usually a traditional tape library), there exists a central server arbitrating access to device (for all the other SAN servers) ... The central server however, does not handle data stream itself ...

Famous quotes containing the words aspects and/or technical:

    All the aspects of this desert are beautiful, whether you behold it in fair weather or foul, or when the sun is just breaking out after a storm, and shining on its moist surface in the distance, it is so white, and pure, and level, and each slight inequality and track is so distinctly revealed; and when your eyes slide off this, they fall on the ocean.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    A technical objection is the first refuge of a scoundrel.
    Heywood Broun (1888–1939)