Petals

Some articles on petals:

Anderson's Larkspur
... The flowers usually have sepals of a brilliant dark blue, with the lower two petals the same color and the upper two petals white ... Some individuals have sepals and petals of very light purple or blue to almost white ...
Calochortus Weedii
... sepals and three wider and sometimes shorter petals, each segment up to 3 centimeters long ... The petals are oval or wedge-shaped and may be any of a variety of colors, from cream to deep yellow to reddish purple ... The petals often have reddish brown borders and flecks, and a coating of hairs on the inner surface ...
Calochortus Amoenus - Description
... The inflorescence bears two or more nodding flowers, each with its petals curved closed into a spherical shape ... Each flower has rose-colored sepals and petals, the petals fringed and lined with long, pink whiskery hairs ...
Clarkia Cylindrica
... Each open flower is a bowl of four fan-shaped petals up to about 3.5 centimeters long ... The petals are intergrading shades of lavender, white, and magenta and they are often speckled with purple or pink ... Beneath the petals are bright pink fused sepals ...
Clarkia Franciscana - Description
... The sepals stay fused together as the petals bloom from one side ... The small corolla is bowl-shaped, with petals up to 1.3 centimeters long and wedge-shaped with mostly flat tips ... The petals are lavender-pink in color, darkest at the tips and lightening to nearly white at the base, where there is a deep red spot ...

Famous quotes containing the word petals:

    Which shore?
    Agh, petals maybe. How
    should I know?
    Which shore? Which shore?
    I said petals from an appletree.
    William Carlos Williams (1883–1963)

    The sun that leaps on petals through a nought,
    The come a-cropper rider of the flower.
    Dylan Thomas (1914–1953)

    Just as petals fall from drying garlands, which you can see aimlessly swimming in wine-bowls are we lovers, who now puff up our chests, but perhaps tomorrow the fateful day will shut us down.
    Propertius Sextus (c. 50–16 B.C.)