National Museum of Women in The Arts

The National Museum of Women in the Arts (NMWA), located in Washington, D.C. is the only museum solely dedicated to celebrating women’s achievements in the visual, performing, and literary arts. NMWA was incorporated in 1981 by Wallace and Wilhelmina Holladay. Since opening its doors in 1987, the museum has acquired a collection of more than 4,000 paintings, sculptures, works on paper and decorative art. Highlights of the collection include works by Mary Cassatt, Frida Kahlo, and Élisabeth Louise Vigée-Le Brun. The museum occupies the old Masonic Temple, a building listed on the U.S. National Register of Historic Places.

Read more about National Museum Of Women In The Arts:  History, Collection, Library and Research Center, Exhibitions, Public Programs, Operations

Other articles related to "national museum of women in the arts, museum":

National Museum Of Women In The Arts - Operations
... The museum is located at 1250 New York Avenue and H Street N.W ... The museum is open Monday–Saturday 10 a.m.–5 p.m ... The NMWA Museum Shop is open the same hours at the Museum ...

Famous quotes containing the words arts, women, museum and/or national:

    The arts are not just instantaneous pleasure—if you don’t like it, the artist is wrong. I belong to the generation which says if you don’t like it, you don’t understand and you ought to find out.
    John Drummond (b. 1934)

    Every woman who visited the Fair made it the center of her orbit. Here was a structure designed by a woman, decorated by women, managed by women, filled with the work of women. Thousands discovered women were not only doing something, but had been working seriously for many generations ... [ellipsis in source] Many of the exhibits were admirable, but if others failed to satisfy experts, what of it?
    Kate Field (1838–1908)

    Soaked by the sparkling waters of America.
    Hawaiian saying no. 2740, ‘lelo No’Eau, collected, translated, and annotated by Mary Kawena Pukui, Bishop Museum Press, Hawaii (1983)

    Public speaking is done in the public tongue, the national or tribal language; and the language of our tribe is the men’s language. Of course women learn it. We’re not dumb. If you can tell Margaret Thatcher from Ronald Reagan, or Indira Gandhi from General Somoza, by anything they say, tell me how. This is a man’s world, so it talks a man’s language.
    Ursula K. Le Guin (b. 1929)