Nagoya - Education

Education

Nagoya has a large number primary and secondary schools, which are mostly state-run. A large number of state and private colleges and universities exist throughout the city as well, with many located on the eastern side of the city. Some educational institutions were founded during the opening of the Meiji era according to a Western system, with more to follow during the Taishō and Shōwa eras. Nagoya University was set up in 1871 as a medical school. Nanzan University was set up by the Jesuits in 1932 as a high school and expanded throughout the decades to include Nanzan Junior College and the Nanzan Institute for Religion and Culture. Some universities specialise in engineering and technology such as Nagoya University Engineering school, Nagoya Institute of Technology and Toyota Technological Institute, since the city is a hub of industrial activity, and receive support and grants from companies such as Toyota.

Other colleges and universities include Aichi Prefectural College of Nursing & Health, Aichi Shukutoku Junior College, Aichi Toho University, Chukyo University, Daido University, Doho University, Kinjo Gakuin University, Kinjo Gakuin University Junior College, Meijo University, Nagoya City University, Nagoya College of Music, Nagoya Future Culture College, Nagoya Gakuin University, Nagoya Management Junior College, Nagoya Women's University, St. Mary’s College, Nagoya, Sugiyama Jogakuen University, Sugiyama Jogakuen University Junior College, Tokai Gakuen Women’s College. Various universities from outside Nagoya have set up satellite campuses, such as Tokyo University of Social Welfare.

The Hōsa Library dates back to the 17th century and houses 110,000 items including classic literature, an heirloom of the Owari Tokugawa bequeathed to the city. The Nagoya City Archives have a large collection of documents and books. Tsuruma Central Library is a public library and Nagoya International Center has a collection of foreign-language books.

Read more about this topic:  Nagoya

Other articles related to "education":

Outcome-based Education - What Is OBE?
... Outcome-based education is a model of education that rejects the traditional focus on what the school provides to students, in favor of making students demonstrate that they "know ... judge if a system has implemented an outcomes-based education systems are Creation of a curriculum framework that outlines specific, measurable outcomes ... A commitment not only to provide an opportunity of education, but to require learning outcomes for advancement ...
Internationalization (Globalization and Education)
... Education is becoming increasingly international ... promoted the global rules and norms of how the school should operate and what is education ... Baccalaureate have contributed to the internationalization of education ...
Fort Wayne, Indiana - Infrastructure - Education - Libraries
... In 1997, Places Rated Almanac recognized Fort Wayne as having the highest reading quotient of any place in North America, due in part to the city's quality library system. ...
Queens' College, Cambridge - Education At Queens'
... from all academic disciplines, except the combination of Education with English and Drama ... As in all other Cambridge colleges, undergraduate education is based on the tutorial system ...
Yaroslavl - Education
... Amongst the non-state funded institutions for further education in the city is the International Academy for Business and New Technologies (MUBiNT), and also a number of branches from Moscow-bas ...

Famous quotes containing the word education:

    A woman might claim to retain some of the child’s faculties, although very limited and defused, simply because she has not been encouraged to learn methods of thought and develop a disciplined mind. As long as education remains largely induction ignorance will retain these advantages over learning and it is time that women impudently put them to work.
    Germaine Greer (b. 1939)

    You are told a lot about your education, but some beautiful, sacred memory, preserved since childhood, is perhaps the best education of all. If a man carries many such memories into life with him, he is saved for the rest of his days. And even if only one good memory is left in our hearts, it may also be the instrument of our salvation one day.
    Feodor Dostoyevsky (1821–1881)

    Since [Rousseau’s] time, and largely thanks to him, the Ego has steadily tended to efface itself, and, for purposes of model, to become a manikin on which the toilet of education is to be draped in order to show the fit or misfit of the clothes. The object of study is the garment, not the figure.
    Henry Brooks Adams (1838–1918)