Monoamine Oxidase B - Differences Between MAOA and MAOB

Differences Between MAOA and MAOB

MAO-A is involved in the metabolism of tyramine; inhibition, in particular irreversible inhibition of MAO-A can result in a dangerous pressor effect when foods high in tyramine are consumed such as cheeses. MAO-A is involved in the metabolism of serotonin, noradrenaline and dopamine where as MAO-B metabolises the dopamine neurotransmitter. MAO-B is an enzyme on the outer mitochondrial membrane and catalyzes the oxidation of arylalkylamine neurotransmitters

In general, monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) prefers to metabolize norepinephrine (NE), serotonin (5-HT), and dopamine (DA) (and other less clinically relevant chemicals). Monoamine oxidase B, on the other hand, prefers to metabolize dopamine (DA) (and other less clinically relevant chemicals). The differences between the substrate selectivity of the two enzymes are utilized clinically when treating specific disorders: Monoamine oxidase A inhibitors have been used in the treatment of depression, and monoamine oxidase B inhibitors are used in the treatment of Parkinson's disease.

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