List of Birds of Egypt

List Of Birds Of Egypt

This is a list of the known species of the birdlife found in Egypt, a country located in North-East Africa. This includes a total of 487 species of birds, of which thirteen are classified as globally threatened species, and three have been identified as being introduced to Egypt. None of the species are endemic to Egypt.

This list's taxonomic treatment (designation and sequence of orders, families, and species) and nomenclature (common and scientific names) follow the conventions of Clements's 5th edition. All of the birds that fall into the category or in the likeness of any of the descriptors found in the table seen below are included in the total bird count for Egypt.

Within this list, the one to two character tags that are applied to each bird species correspond to the criteria of status or distribution in Egypt. These tags are present next to the common name and binomial name of an appropriate species in the list. Note that not every species of bird found in this list are accompanied with a tag. The following table documents the meaning of each tag to be used in the list:

  • (A) – Accidental, A species that rarely or accidentally occurs in Egypt.
  • (I) – Introduced, A species introduced to Egypt as a consequence, direct or indirect, of human actions.
  • (Ex) – Extirpated, A species that no longer occurs in Egypt although populations exist elsewhere.


<table> Table of contents

Non-passerines: Ostriches . Loons . Grebes . Albatrosses . Shearwaters and Petrels . Storm-Petrels . Tropicbirds . Pelicans . Boobies and Gannets . Cormorants . Darters . Bitterns, Herons and Egrets . Storks . Ibises and Spoonbills . Flamingos . Ducks, Geese and Swans . Osprey . Hawks, Kites and Eagles . Caracaras and Falcons . Pheasants and Partridges . Cranes . Rails, Crakes, Gallinules, and Coots . Bustards . Painted snipe . Crab Plover . Oystercatchers . Avocets and Stilts . Thick-knees . Pratincoles and Coursers . Plovers and Lapwings . Sandpipers and allies . Skuas and Jaegers . Gulls . Terns . Skimmers . Auks, Murres, and Puffins . Sandgrouse . Pigeons and Doves . Parrots, Macaws and allies . Cuckoos and Anis . Barn owls . Typical owls . Nightjars . Swifts . Kingfishers . Bee-eaters . Typical Rollers . Hoopoes . Woodpeckers and allies .

Passerines: Larks . Swallows and Martins . Wagtails and Pipits . Bulbuls . Kinglets . Grey Hypocolius . Wrens . Accentors . Thrushes and allies . Cisticolas and allies . Old World warblers . Old World flycatchers . Babblers . Chickadees and Titmice . Penduline tits . Sunbirds and Spiderhunters . Old World Orioles . Shrikes . Bushshrikes and allies . Crows, Jays, Ravens and Magpies . Starlings . Weavers and allies . Waxbills and allies . Buntings, Sparrows, Seedeaters and allies . Siskins, Crossbills and allies . Sparrows .

See also References

Read more about List Of Birds Of Egypt:  Ostriches, Loons, Grebes, Albatrosses, Shearwaters and Petrels, Storm-Petrels, Tropicbirds, Pelicans, Boobies and Gannets, Cormorants, Darters, Bitterns, Herons and Egrets, Storks, Ibises and Spoonbills, Flamingos, Ducks, Geese and Swans, Osprey, Hawks, Kites and Eagles, Caracaras and Falcons, Pheasants and Partridges, Cranes, Rails, Crakes, Gallinules, and Coots, Bustards, Painted Snipe, Crab Plover, Oystercatchers, Avocets and Stilts, Thick-knees, Pratincoles and Coursers, Plovers and Lapwings, Sandpipers and Allies, Skuas and Jaegers, Gulls, Terns, Skimmers, Auks, Murres, and Puffins, Sandgrouse, Pigeons and Doves, Parrots, Macaws and Allies, Cuckoos and Anis, Barn Owls, Typical Owls, Nightjars, Swifts, Kingfishers, Bee-eaters, Typical Rollers, Hoopoes, Woodpeckers and Allies, Larks, Swallows and Martins, Wagtails and Pipits, Bulbuls, Kinglets, Grey Hypocolius, Wrens, Accentors, Thrushes and Allies, Cisticolas and Allies, Old World Warblers, Old World Flycatchers, Babblers, Chickadees and Titmice, Penduline Tits, Sunbirds and Spiderhunters, Old World Orioles, Shrikes, Bushshrikes and Allies, Crows, Jays, Ravens and Magpies, Starlings, Weavers and Allies, Waxbills and Allies, Buntings, Sparrows, Seedeaters and Allies, Siskins, Crossbills and Allies, Sparrows

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