History of West Bengal

The history of West Bengal began in 1947, when the Hindu-dominated western part of British Bengal Province became the Indian state of West Bengal.

When India gained independence in 1947, Bengal was partitioned along religious lines. The western part went to India (and was named West Bengal) while the eastern part joined Pakistan as a province called East Bengal (later renamed East Pakistan, giving rise to independent Bangladesh in 1971). These conditions as have remained unresolved in some twisted forms have given birth to local socio-economic, political and ethnic movements.

Read more about History Of West Bengal:  Shiddharthrasankar Roys Era (1972-1977), Budhdhadev Bhattacharya Era (2000-2011)

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