Health Effects of Wine

Health Effects Of Wine

Wine and health is an issue of considerable discussion and research. Wine has a long history of use as an early form of medication, being recommended variously as a safe alternative to drinking water, an antiseptic for treating wounds and a digestive aid, as well as a cure for a wide range of ailments from lethargy and diarrhea to easing the pain of child birth.

Ancient Egyptian Papyri and Sumerian tablets dating back to 2200 BC detail the medicinal role of wine, making it the world's oldest documented man-made medicine. Wine continued to play a major role in medicine until the late 19th and early 20th century, when changing opinions and medical research on alcohol and alcoholism cast doubt on the role of wine as part of a healthy lifestyle and diet.

In the late 20th and early 21st century, fueled in part by public interest in reports by the United States news broadcast 60 Minutes on the so-called "French Paradox", the medical establishment began to re-evaluate the role of moderate wine consumption in health.

Read more about Health Effects Of Wine:  Historical Role of Wine in Medicine, What Is Moderate Consumption?, Heavy Metals in Wine Controversy

Other articles related to "health effects of wine, wine, health":

Health Effects Of Wine - Heavy Metals in Wine Controversy
... Kingston University in London discovered red wine to contain high levels of toxic metals relative to other beverages in the sample ... in other plant-based beverages, the sample wine tested significantly higher for all metal ions, especially vanadium ... was calculated using "target hazard quotients" (THQ), a method of quantifying health concerns associated with lifetime exposure to chemical pollutants ...

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