Graphics Modes

Some articles on graphics modes, graphics, mode, modes:

Apple2gs - Hardware Features - Graphics Modes
... In addition to supporting all graphics modes of previous Apple II models, the Apple IIGS introduced several new ones through a custom Video Graphics Chip (VGC), all of which used a 12-bit ... In this mode, the VGC holds 16 separate palettes of 16 colors in its own memory ... This mode is handled entirely by the VGC with no CPU assistance, making it perfect for games and high-speed animation ...
Atari BASIC - Description - Graphics - Operating System Support
... The operating System provided several standard "Graphics modes" by which it set up a display list automatically, and allocated memory, at the top end of free ... These provided a range of graphics modes including text modes, graphics modes and mixed text-and-graphics modes ... It was only these predefined modes that were available to Atari BASIC ...
ATM (computer) - Graphics Modes
640 x 200 mode has colour attribute byte for each 8 pixels. 320 x 200 mode (16 colours) is ordinary raster mode, but not similar to EGA (it is two-pixel chunky, not planar like EGA) ... Two games for this mode were converted directly from PC Prince of Persia and Goblins (computer game), and one from Sony PlayStation Time Gal ...
ANTIC - The Display List
... allows the Atari 8-bit computers to produce complex, mixed-mode displays without direct CPU intervention while other platforms, even those designed much later, cannot either mix graphics modes in one ... in the Display List and translates these instructions into a real-time stream of graphics data to the CTIA/GTIA chip which provides the color ... Together the two chips provide 6 text and 8 graphics modes (14 total) ...
Graphics Mode Details - Apple II Graphics Modes
... See also Apple II graphics modes The Apple II featured not only the graphics modes of its precursors, but several new modes similar to ones found on the Atari ST and Commodore Amiga ...

Famous quotes containing the word modes:

    The history of reform is always identical; it is the comparison of the idea with the fact. Our modes of living are not agreeable to our imagination. We suspect they are unworthy. We arraign our daily employments.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)