Grapheme - Types of Graphemes

Types of Graphemes

The principal types of graphemes are logograms, which represent words or morphemes (for example, Chinese characters, or the ampersand & representing the English word and; also Arabic numerals); syllabic characters, representing syllables (as in Japanese kana); and alphabetic letters, corresponding roughly to phonemes (see next section). Graphemes also include additional symbols used in writing, such as marks of punctuation.

For a full discussion of the different types, see Writing system: Functional classification of writing systems.

Read more about this topic:  Grapheme

Other articles related to "types, type, types of":

Prolog - Extensions - Types
... Attempts to introduce types date back to the 1980s, and as of 2008 there are still attempts to extend Prolog with types ... Type information is useful not only for type safety but also for reasoning about Prolog programs ...
Netwar - Network Structures
... Arquilla and Ronfeldt point to three basic types of networks that may be used by netwar actors Chain network – typified by smuggling networks, where end-to-end exchanges (information, contraband, etc.) must ... may also take on hybrid forms as well, blending different types of networks and hierarchies ... may be networked to each other through different types of network structures ...

Famous quotes containing the words types of and/or types:

    The wider the range of possibilities we offer children, the more intense will be their motivations and the richer their experiences. We must widen the range of topics and goals, the types of situations we offer and their degree of structure, the kinds and combinations of resources and materials, and the possible interactions with things, peers, and adults.
    Loris Malaguzzi (1920–1994)

    Science is intimately integrated with the whole social structure and cultural tradition. They mutually support one other—only in certain types of society can science flourish, and conversely without a continuous and healthy development and application of science such a society cannot function properly.
    Talcott Parsons (1902–1979)