Geological Society of America

Geological Society Of America

The Geological Society of America (R) (or GSA) is a nonprofit organization dedicated to the advancement of the geosciences. The society was founded in New York in 1888 by Alexander Winchell, John J. Stevenson, Charles H. Hitchcock, John R. Procter and Edward Orton and has been headquartered at 3300 Penrose Place, Boulder, Colorado, USA, since 1968. As of 2007, the society has over 21,000 members in more than 85 countries. The stated mission of GSA is "to advance the geosciences, to enhance the professional growth of its members, and to promote the geosciences in the service of humankind". Its main activities are sponsoring scientific meetings and publishing scientific literature, particularly the journals Geological Society of America Bulletin (commonly called "GSA Bulletin") and Geology. A more recent publication endeavor is the online-only science journal Geosphere. In February 2009, GSA began publishing Lithosphere. GSA's monthly news and science magazine, GSA Today, is open access online.

The society has six regional sections in North America, an international section, and seventeen specialty divisions.

GSA began with 100 members under its first president, James Hall. Over the next 43 years it grew slowly but steadily to 600 members until 1931, when a $4 million endowment from 1930 president R.A.F. Penrose, Jr. jumpstarted the GSA's growth. As of July 2012, GSA has more than 25,000 members in 100 countries.

Read more about Geological Society Of America:  Annual Meetings, Position Statements, Past Presidents

Other articles related to "geological society of america":

Geological Society Of America - Past Presidents
... Past presidents of the Geological Society of America James Hall, 1889 James Dwight Dana, 1890 Alexander Winchell, 1891 Grove Karl "G.K." Gilbert, 1892 J ...

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