David Dixon Porter - Marriage and Family

Marriage and Family

Porter and Georgy Patterson were married on March 10, 1839. Of their four sons, three had military careers, and their two surviving daughters married men who had military service or were active officers.

  • Major David Essex Porter served in the army during the Civil War, but resigned after two years in the peacetime army.
  • Captain Theodoric Porter made his career in the navy.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Carlile Patterson Porter was an officer in the US Marine Corps; his son, David Dixon Porter II, also served in the Marines, rising to the rank of major general and earning the Medal of Honor.
  • One of their two surviving daughters, Elizabeth, married Leavitt Curtis Logan, who achieved the rank of Rear Admiral.
  • Their other surviving daughter, Elena, married Charles H. Campbell, a former army officer who had left the service before their marriage.
  • Richard Bache Porter was the only child to have no relation to the military services.

Read more about this topic:  David Dixon Porter

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