Charles Sanders Peirce Bibliography

This Charles Sanders Peirce bibliography consolidates numerous references to Charles Sanders Peirce's writings, including letters, manuscripts, publications, and Nachlass. For an extensive chronological list of Peirce's works (titled in English), see the Chronologische √úbersicht (Chronological Overview) on the Schriften (Writings) page for Charles Sanders Peirce.

Read more about Charles Sanders Peirce Bibliography:  Abbreviations, Primary Literature, Secondary Literature

Other articles related to "charles sanders peirce bibliography, peirce, charles, charles sanders peirce":

Charles Sanders Peirce Bibliography - Secondary Literature - Other Works
... Peirce, Springer catalog page, 192 pages, hardcover (ISBN 978-9024735747, ISBN 90-247-3574-2). 1995), "Peirce Rustled, Russell Pierced How Charles Peirce and Bertrand Russell Viewed Each Other's Work in Logic, and an Assessment of Russell's Accuracy ... Arisbe Eprint (1997), "Tarski's Development of Peirce's Logic of Relations" (Google Books Eprint), in Studies in the Logic of Charles Sanders Peirce, Indiana University Press catalog ...

Famous quotes containing the words charles sanders, peirce and/or sanders:

    It is not too much to say that next after the passion to learn there is no quality so indispensable to the successful prosecution of science as imagination. Find me a people whose early medicine is not mixed up with magic and incantations, and I will find you a people devoid of all scientific ability.
    Charles Sanders Peirce (1839–1914)

    I think of consciousness as a bottomless lake, whose waters seem transparent, yet into which we can clearly see but a little way. But in this water there are countless objects at different depths; and certain influences will give certain kinds of those objects an upward influence which may be intense enough and continue long enough to bring them into the upper visible layer. After the impulse ceases they commence to sink downwards.
    —Charles Sanders Peirce (1839–1914)

    One will meet, for example, the virtual assumption that what is relative to thought cannot be real. But why not, exactly? Red is relative to sight, but the fact that this or that is in that relation to vision that we call being red is not itself relative to sight; it is a real fact.
    —Charles Sanders Peirce (1839–1914)