Who is Johann Wolfgang von Goethe?

  • (noun): German poet and novelist and dramatist who lived in Weimar (1749-1832).
    Synonyms: Goethe

Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (, 28 August 1749 – 22 March 1832) was a German writer, artist, and politician. His body of work includes epic and lyric poetry written in a variety of metres and styles; prose and verse dramas; memoirs; an autobiography; literary and aesthetic criticism; treatises on botany, anatomy, and colour; and four novels. In addition, numerous literary and scientific fragments, and over 10,000 letters written by him are extant, as are nearly 3,000 drawings.

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Some articles on Johann Wolfgang von Goethe:

Doppelgänger - Notable Reports - Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
... Near the end of Book XI of his autobiography, Dichtung und Wahrheit ("Poetry and Truth"), Goethe wrote, almost in passing. ...
Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe - Influence
... Goethe had a great effect on the nineteenth century ... Goethe embodied many of the contending strands in art over the next century his work could be lushly emotional, and rigorously formal, brief and epigrammatic, and epic ... Goethe was also a cultural force, who argued that the organic nature of the land moulded the people and their customs—an argument that has recurred ever since ...

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    Several classical sayings that one likes to repeat had quite a different meaning from the ones later times attributed to them.
    —Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe (1749–1832)

    So as to comprehend that the sky is blue everywhere one doesn’t need to travel around the world.
    Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe (1749–1832)

    Tolerance should really be only a temporary attitude; it must lead to recognition. To tolerate means to offend.
    Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe (1749–1832)

    The thinking person has the strange characteristic to like to create a fantasy in the place of the unsolved problem, a fantasy that stays with the person even when the problem has been solved and truth made its appearance.
    —Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe (1749–1832)

    It is after all the greatest art to limit and isolate oneself.
    —Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe (1749–1832)

    Tolerance should really be only a temporary attitude; it must lead to recognition. To tolerate means to offend.
    —Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe (1749–1832)

    We don’t get to know people when they come to us; we have to go to them so as to learn what they are like.
    —Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe (1749–1832)