Spoken

Spoken is the past participle form of "to speak".

Spoken may also refer to:

  • Spoken (band), a Christian rock group from Arkansas
  • Spoken (album), an album by Spoken

Other articles related to "spoken":

Culture Of Nepal - Languages and Literature
... census, at least 92 different living languages are spoken in Nepal, though other studies list 123 living languages ... The major languages of Nepal (percent spoken as mother tongue) are Nepali (49%), Maithili (12%), Bhojpuri (8%), Tharu (6%), Tamang (5%), Newari/Nepal Bhasa ... The remaining languages are each spoken as mother tongue by less than one percent of the population, for example Dura ...
MIMAROPA - Languages
... Tagalog is widely spoken in the region ... In Marinduque, Tagalog is spoken with a unique blend of Bicolano and Visayan languages ... In the interior of Mindoro, various languages are spoken by Mangyans, and they include Iraya, Alangan, Tawbuid, Hanunoo, Tadyawan, Buhid, and Ratagnon ...
Aymara Language
... Aymara (Aymar aru) is an Aymaran language spoken by the Aymara people of the Andes ... It is also spoken around the Lake Titicaca region of southern Peru and, to a much lesser extent, by some communities in northern Chile and in Northwest Argentina ... that Aymara is related to its more widely spoken neighbour, Quechua ...
Versant
... The Versant suite of tests are computerized tests of spoken language available from Pearson ... Versant tests were the first fully automated tests of spoken language to use advanced speech processing technology (including speech recognition) to assess the spoken ...
Papiamento
... Papiamento (or Papiamentu) is the most widely spoken language on the Caribbean ABC islands, having the official status on the islands of Aruba and Curaçao ... Papiamento has two main dialects Papiamento, spoken primarily on Aruba and Papiamentu, spoken primarily on Bonaire and Curaçao ...

Famous quotes containing the word spoken:

    “Speak when you’re spoken to!” the Queen sharply interrupted her.
    “But if everybody obeyed that rule,” said Alice, who was always ready for a little argument, “and if you only spoke when you were spoken to, and the other person always waited for you to begin, you see nobody would ever say anything, so that—”
    Lewis Carroll [Charles Lutwidge Dodgson] (1832–1898)

    I shall christen this style the Mandarin, since it is beloved by literary pundits, by those who would make the written word as unlike as possible to the spoken one. It is the style of all those writers whose tendency is to make their language convey more than they mean or more than they feel, it is the style of most artists and all humbugs.
    Cyril Connolly (1903–1974)

    Were you to converse with a king, you ought to be as easy and unembarrassed as with your own valet-de chambre; but yet every look, word, and action should imply the utmost respect.... You must wait till you are spoken to; you must receive, not give, the subject of conversation, and you must even take care that the given subject of such conversation do not lead you into any impropriety.
    Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl Chesterfield (1694–1773)