Sake

Sake (/ˈsɑːkeɪ/ or /ˈsɑːki/) is an alcoholic beverage of Japanese origin that is made from fermented rice. It may also be spelled saké or saki.

In the Japanese language, the word sake refers to any alcoholic beverage, while the beverage called sake in English is termed nihonshu (日本酒, "Japanese liquor").

Read more about Sake:  Overview, History

Other articles related to "sake":

Sawanotsuru
... is one of Japan’s largest producers of sake ... founded in 1717 in Nada-ku, Kobe, a region famous for sake production ... its sake is exported to approximately 30 countries ...
Sakura Sake - Track List
... "Sakura Sake" Takeshi Aida (相田 毅, Aida Takeshi?), Sho Sakurai Shin Tanimoto (谷本 新, Tanimoto Shin?) 423 2 ... "Sakura Sake" (Karaoke) Aida, Sakurai Tanimoto 423 4 ... "Sakura Sake" Aida, Sakurai Tanimoto 423 2 ...
Saijō, Hiroshima (Kamo) - Sake
... is famed for one thing in particular, it is sake (rice wine) ... Within the narrow streets of the Sakagura Dori ("Sake Storehouse Road") area near JR Saijō Station are the Namako wall (white-lattice walled) and Sekishu Gawara (red-roof tile ... Each October there is also the Saijō Sake Matsuri 酒まつり (Sake Festival) which draws crowds of between 100-200,000 revelers and sake connoisseurs before the brewing season (October–March) begins ...
Philip Harper (sake Brewer) - Current Career
... Harper used his expertise in brewing to create his own brand of sake for the brewery ... for his excellent brands of sake ... Harper continues to brew sake at Kinoshita-Shuzou, hoping to spread the taste of the traditional Japanese drink throughout the world and revive the brew in its homeland ...

Famous quotes containing the word sake:

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    Harriet Beecher Stowe (1811–1896)

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    Aldous Huxley (1894–1963)