Radix Point

In mathematics and computing, a radix point (or radix character) is the symbol used in numerical representations to separate the integer part of a number (to the left of the radix point) from its fractional part (to the right of the radix point). "Radix point" is a general term that applies to all number bases. In base 10 notation, the radix point is more commonly called the decimal point, where the prefix deci- implies base 10. Similarly, the term "binary point" is used for base 2.

In English-speaking countries, the radix point is usually a small dot, ., placed either on the baseline or halfway between the baseline and the top of the numerals. In other regions, a comma (,) is usually used instead (see decimal separator for further information).

Read more about Radix Point:  Examples

Other articles related to "radix point":

Radix Point - Examples
10 (decimal) 13.625 In this example, 13 is the integer to the left of the radix point, and 625 (i.e ... is now seen that 1101, which is to the left of the radix point, is the binary representation of the decimal number 13 ... To the right of the radix point is 101, which is the binary representation of the decimal fraction 625/1000 (or 5/8) ...
Quater-imaginary Base - Radix Point "."
... A radix point in the decimal system is the usual ... In the quater-imaginary system a radix point can also be used ... For a digit string the radix point marks the separation between positive and negative powers of b ...
Positional Notation - Mathematics - Exponentiation
... digits between a given digit and the radix point ... If a given digit is on the left hand side of the radix point (i.e ... then n is positive or zero if the digit is on the right hand side of the radix point (i.e ...

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