Joe Tex - Music Career - Success

Success

Tex recorded his first hit, "Hold On To What You've Got", in November 1964 at FAME Studios in Muscle Shoals, Alabama. Tex was not convinced the song would be a hit and advised Killen not to release it. However, Killen felt otherwise and released the song in early 1965. By the time Tex got wind of its release, the song had already sold 200,000 copies. The song eventually peaked at #5 on the Billboard Hot 100 and became Tex's first number-one hit on the R&B charts, staying on the charts for 11 weeks and selling over a million copies by 1966..

Tex would place six top 40 charted singles on the R&B charts in 1965 alone, including two more number-one hits "I Want To (Do Everything For You)" and "A Sweet Woman Like You". He followed that with two successive albums, Hold On To What You've Got and The New Boss. Tex placed more R&B hits than any artist, including his nemesis James Brown. In 1966, five more singles entered the top 40 on the R&B charts including "The Love You Save" and "S.Y.S.L.J.F.M." or "The Letter Song", which was an answer song to Wilson Pickett's "634-5789 (Soulsville, U.S.A.)".

His 1967 hits included "Show Me", which became an often-covered tune for British rock artists and later some country and pop artists, and his second million-selling hit, "Skinny Legs and All". The latter song, released off Tex's pseudo live album, Live and Lively, stayed on the charts for 15 weeks and was awarded a gold disc by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) in January 1968. After leaving Atlantic for Mercury, Tex had several more R&B hits including "Buying a Book" in 1970 and "Give the Baby Anything the Baby Wants" in 1971. The intro saxophone riffs in his 1969 song, "You're Right, Ray Charles" later influenced Funkadelic's "Standing on the Verge of Gettin' It On".

Tex recorded his next big hit, "I Gotcha", in December 1971. The song was released in January 1972 and stayed on the charts for 20 weeks, staying at #2 on the Hot 100 for two weeks and sold over two million copies becoming his biggest-selling hit to date. Tex was offered a gold disc of the song on March 22, 1972. The parent album reached #17 on the pop albums chart. Following this and another album, Tex announced his retirement from show business in September 1972 to pursue life as a minister for Islam. Tex returned to his music career following the death of Elijah Muhammad in 1975, releasing the top 40 R&B hit, "Under Your Powerful Love". His last hit, "Ain't Gonna Bump No More (With No Big Fat Woman)", was released in 1977 and peaked at #12 on the Hot 100 and #2 in the UK.

Tex's last public appearances were as part of a revised 1980s version of the Soul Clan in 1981. After that, Tex withdrew from public life settling at his ranch in Navasota, Texas and watching football games by his favorite team, the Houston Oilers.

Read more about this topic:  Joe Tex, Music Career

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