Yuwen Tai

Yuwen Tai (Chinese: 宇文泰; pinyin: Yǔwén Tài) (507–556), nickname Heita (黑獺), formally Duke Wen of Anding (安定文公), later further posthumously honored by Northern Zhou initially as Prince Wen (文王) then as Emperor Wen (文皇帝) with the temple name Taizu (太祖), was the paramount general of the Chinese/Xianbei state Western Wei, a branch successor state of Northern Wei. In 534, Emperor Xiaowu of Northern Wei, seeking to assert power independent of the paramount general Gao Huan, fled to Yuwen's domain, and when Gao subsequently proclaimed Emperor Xiaojing of Eastern Wei emperor, a split of Northern Wei was effected, and when Yuwen subsequently poisoned Emperor Xiaowu to death around the new year 535 and declared his cousin Yuan Baoju emperor (as Emperor Wen), the split was formalized, with the part under Gao's and Emperor Xiaojing's control known as Eastern Wei and the part under Yuwen's and Emperor Wen's control known as Western Wei. For the rest of his life, Yuwen endeavored to make Western Wei, then much weaker than its eastern counterpart, a strong state, and after his death, his son Yuwen Jue seized the throne from Emperor Gong of Western Wei, establishing Northern Zhou.

Read more about Yuwen Tai:  Early Career, Taking Control Over Western Provinces, Alliance With Emperor Xiaowu, During Emperor Wen's Reign, During Emperors Fei's Reign, During Emperor Gong's Reign, Personal Information

Other articles related to "yuwen tai, yuwen":

Change Of Xianbei Names To Han Names - Changes
... in 534, the paramount general of Western Wei, Yuwen Tai, tried to reverse these name changes and restore Xianbei names ... but after the destruction of Western Wei's successor state, Northern Zhou (which was ruled by Yuwen Tai's descendants), the Han names were restored for Han and Xianbei ... Yuwen Tai further had Han officials and generals change their names to Xianbei names, although this change was itself rescinded by the regent Yang Jian ...
Emperor Ming Of Northern Zhou - Background
... Yuwen Yu was born in 534, as the oldest son of the then-Northern Wei general Yuwen Tai ... His mother was Yuwen Tai's concubine Lady Yao ... important city of Tongwan (統萬, in modern Yulin, Shaanxi) while accompanying Yuwen Tai on an inspection of the city ...
Empress Ruogan
... In 554, after the paramount general Yuwen Tai deposed his brother Emperor Fei, Yuwen made him emperor, and he created her empress ... In 556, after Yuwen Tai's death, Yuwen Tai's nephew Yuwen Hu forced Emperor Gong to yield the throne to Yuwen Tai's son Yuwen Jue, ending Western Wei and starting Northern Zhou ... Chinese royalty Preceded by Empress Yuwen Empress of Northern Wei (Western) 554–556 Dynasty ended Empress of China (Western) 554–556 Succeeded by Empress Yuan ...
Empress Yuan Humo
... during her husband Emperor Xiaomin (Yuwen Jue)'s reign, her title was actually "princess" since he used the alternative title "Heavenly Prince" (Tian Wang)) ... Sometime after Yuwen Jue, the son and heir of then-paramount general Yuwen Tai, was created the Duke of Lüeyang in 550, she married Yuwen Jue as his duchess ... After Yuwen Tai died in 556, Yuwen Jue inherited his titles, under the guardianship of Yuwen Tai's nephew Yuwen Hu ...
Yuwen Tai - Personal Information
... Father Yuwen Gong (宇文肱) (d ... honored as Empress Yuan, mother of Yuwen Jue Major Concubines Lady Yao, mother of Yuwen Yu Lady Chinu, mother of Yuwen Yong and Yuwen Zhi Lady Dabugan, mother of Yuwen Xian Lady Wang, mother of Yuwen ... executed by Emperor Xuan of Northern Zhou 578) Yuwen Zhi (宇文直), initially the Duke of Qin Commandery (created 556), later the Duke of Wei, later Prince ...