Yellow - Symbolism and Associations

Symbolism and Associations

In the west, yellow is not a well-loved color; in a 2000 survey, only six percent of respondents in Europe and America named it as their favorite color. compared with 45 percent for blue, 15 percent for green, 12 percent for red, and 10 percent for black. For seven percent of respondents, it was their least favorite color. Yellow is the color of ambivalence and contradiction, the color associated with optimism and amusement but also with betrayal and duplicity. But in China and other parts of Asia, yellow is a color of virtue and nobility.

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