World Information Society Day

World Information Society Day was proclaimed to be on 17 May by a United Nations General Assembly resolution, following the 2005 World Summit on the Information Society in Tunis.

The day had previously been known as World Telecommunication Day to commemorate the founding of the International Telecommunication Union in 17 May 1865. It was instituted by the Plenipotentiary Conference in Malaga-Torremolinos in 1973.

The main objective of the day is to raise global awareness of societal changes brought about by the Internet and new technologies. It also aims to help reduce the Digital divide.

Read more about World Information Society DayWorld Information Society Day, World Telecommunication and Information Society Day, See Also

Other articles related to "world information society day, day, society day":

World Information Society Day - See Also
... System Administrator Appreciation Day Programmers' Day Testers' Day ITU Global Cybersecurity Agenda Digital Society Day, each 17 October in India ...

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